Dogs, eh?

My neighborhood

I get a little frustrated when on a nice, quiet walk, a dog in the neighborhood barks at me. Of course, he or she means to warn the residents that there is either an intruder, a stranger, or a suspicious being in the premises, whose intentions are worth investigating. The thing is, I am none of the above. I have walked this particular neighborhood countless times before, and expect the dogs to kind of know me by now. However, they seem to take no heed of this fact and continue to bark anyway. Perhaps what frustrates me is the fact that they always catch me unawares and distort my thoughts in the process. I still love dogs though.

Published by Msdedeng

At 41, I am still figuring out life: my place in society, my career path, a family of my own, any many others things. Heck, I am still trying to make friends in California; a place I moved to 3 years ago. I am currently in a Community College to make up for the many years I missed school while in Africa (Uganda). I intend to transfer to university next year and double major in History and English. I lead a very ordinary life; a normal day is spent doing school assignments, hiking, or reading. My favorite thing to do is walk! Short walks or long walks it does not matter. Walking allows me to think about things - anything! My love of walking comes from where I grew up, a small village in northeastern Uganda. It is still one of the most remotest areas I will ever know, and couldn't even start comparing what life is like there to say a place like California. Walking was all I did while growing up! I walked for miles to school, to church, to the shops, to the borehole to fetch water, and to the market. It was quite an adventure unlike any other - so you now understand my love for walking.

102 thoughts on “Dogs, eh?

  1. My dogs always bark when someone comes to the house, no matter if they know who it is or not. But you can tell the difference between people they know and they don’t know by the way they sound.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Border collies are the ones that round up the sheep (they also do the flyball race at Crufts) and springers are used a lot as sniffer dogs. Maggie could sniff for England, she would quarter an area and not miss an inch. The eyesight, joints and hearing were going, but there was nothing wrong with her sniffer. She could smell the cheese as soon as we opened the fridge.
    Maggie was black and white like her Mum as were all the other pups, but Dad was a liver and white springer. There wasn’t a single brown bit of fur on any of them.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Oh my gosh, hard work he is. Most of their time is spent on training him. He weighted 45 pounds at four months. They were told that he would weight up to 100 pounds by the time he is fully grown. That is exactly his color, a brownish tan.

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  4. Ah! what a cool story about Sir Barkalot (cool name too).
    My SIL has a Rhodesian Ridgeback . He is very active and so loving. He likes to give his family kisses πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Thank you. She was our furbaby. Dogs are indeed a part of our lives. What sort of pup has your SIL got? People may not know my name, but mention ‘the dog lady’ here and it will probably register. I know most of the dogs on the block, but couldn’t tell you half the owners names! My sister had a barker, I called him Sir Barkalot as that was all he did. We stayed one weekend to look after my Mum and he would not shut up, so I barked back! He was really surprised, and went to bed to sulk. He thought about barking again but I just looked at him, and it died in his throat! Guess I was a dog in a former life. I love them all, regardless of size or breed.
    Hope you find things to interest you here, and look forward to more comments. I love the interaction.

    Liked by 2 people

  6. I am sorry to hear about Maggie. Dogs are a part of us. My sister-in-law got puppy five months ago. He is so loving and I got attached to him for the two weeks I visited them. I can only imagine how much you miss your Maggie. And thanks for the tip. Take care, P.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Ah, but do you talk to them? We have several barkers on the block, some will bark at me for no reason when being walked by their owners, and from the opposite side of the road (to socially distance, not a threat of being bitten) I tell them to shush as I know they are all bluster. A lot of dogs are missing the fuss I used to give them pre Covid. Having lost our precious Maggie, it’s nice to get a puppy fix when out, and extended leads come into their own. Two dogs in particular were quite distressed at not having the fuss from me, so we got round it by me doing the actions from across the road, and the owner rubbing tummies or stroking behind the ears. It worked!
    I love dogs too, but at the moment we have no plans for another. Losing Maggie hurts so much.
    Have a good weekend.

    Liked by 2 people

  8. Rosie, thank you for your comment. You remind me of how very enthusiastic dogs can be. I almost forgot that fact, but now that you mention eager and duty, I remember how I have thought of them as energetic beings most of the time.
    From my German bloggers on here, I know that you have been getting a lot of snow. πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Oh yes,MsDeng, I know how you feel when a dog doesn’t seem to know you.
    We don’t have a dog, but my parents always had a dog and so did my sister.
    That’s why I know that a dog always takes its duties very seriously. When a dog is supposed to guard the house, he does it eagerly. He feels important and he wants to show you that.
    And some dogs like to be talked to in a friendly manner.

    MsDend, Thank You for the nice view of your neighborhood!
    I like it. πŸ™‚
    Rosie from Germany

    Liked by 1 person

  10. My family has always had dogs, and I love dogs. It’s just that in Africa, dogs are not treated as dogs here. Here, dogs are like kids or family members and that’s why I am learning these ways.
    Thank you for your comment.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. This is perhaps the best explanation I have ever heard, and makes so much sense. Thank you so much for reminding me that not all living things around us are human beings. Animals like dogs, etc., have their own way of communication and i just need to realize that and see their perspective. Thank you so much, Jay.

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  12. They are perhaps just saying hello.
    Dogs don’t have words, they only have barks, and not everything they say is meant to be mean or warnings, plenty of them mean: hi there! notice me? wanna play? you smell nice! i know you! If your human neighbour greeted you every time you saw them, you wouldn’t notice. It would be impolite not to. Same with dogs. They acknowledge you.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Then you are in a bit of an unfortunate spot there. I took the advice of many bloggers on here and decided to soothingly talk to one of the “tough” dogs. What followed was surprising: he wagged his tail and stopped barking, haha. If it wasn’t for your allergies, then maybe you could try my tactic. Oh, well πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Nice picture, Angela. Dogs can smell when someone is scared of them and that is the reason they bark at us. I too have a golden retriever and she is such a darling but if some stranger comes to our house she will immediately bark. That is what dogs are all about.

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  15. Haha, you have captured it so well with other dogs at earshot of the bark, all going off.And yet you also point out something, that after I have passed the noise and reached the top, it’s all good again. Quiet and peaceful, with a clean breeze on my face.
    Thank you for the laugh πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Oh Angela, I sympathize completely with your situation, as the same thing happens to me!

    In my case, though, it’s my mother’s neighbors’ dog. Though I’ve visited, probably, once a week on average since the dog was a puppy, he still goes spastic every time he sees me. This, despite the fact I get along really well with the neighbors. Doesn’t matter.

    Naturally, the dog carrying on encourages all other neighborhood canines within earshot, and before long every local dog is offering his/her opinion.

    Of course, your own situation may be worse yet, as “your” dog’s antics mar that spectacular scenery. One hopes that, by the time you’re in the spot from which you snapped that fantastic photo, you’re well past that dog’s “territory” and have relaxed enough to take pleasure once again in the setting.

    Liked by 1 person

  17. Aww, I am learning that from all the amazing comments I have received on here like yours. And it’s true, because I put it into practice yesterday. I walked passed one of the dog’s house, and when he barked, I talked to him friendly. What followed surprised me, he wagged his tail and stopped barking. Isn’t that great?

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  18. There’s a street I hate walking everyone seems to have crazy dogs in it and when one dog starts barking all of them start barking and you find yourself hoping none of the dogs will venture out of their properties to confront you…

    Reminds me of walking past a car and the car alarm goes off and now you have to try and not look suspicious 🀣🀣
    ~B

    Liked by 1 person

  19. Aahh…..so they are not strays like we are used to seeing in our country. The fault is actually mine for always looking at things from my own perspective…that’s the problem with ageing.
    If they are living in houses, for all you know their barking may be out of their jealousy, for your freedom and your ability to walk outside while they have to stay inside and cannot follow their heart. πŸ˜€

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  20. OK, I am terrible at explaining things, but there are especially 2 dogs in two separate homes. They actually live close to the other only separated by a few houses. Sometimes, I am able to pass the first house without the dog ferociously running to the gate and barking, but there is that last red/orange house, whose dog never misses a chance to bark as I pass. He is a mix of a pit-bull and something. Scary looking, but I will take time to stop and talk to him next time. Thank you for your interest in my well being, haha.

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  21. Ohhh….so it’s a group that is trying to keep their territory intact. That is a bit more problematic then. One amongst them then should be the leader….if you can identify and tackle him, then the other two will also fall in line. Some more theory to confuse you more. 😊

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  22. You totally have, G. Your “intruder” theory is my guess. What I have to do now is learn to talk to them, because it’s the same 3 dogs every time. Thank you for your help. πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  23. I am not an expert on dogs but would love to provide my theory on this… Dogs are basically territorial and like to guard their territory. So the dog that is barking at you is not liking the fact that you are intruding into its territory. Now usually what happens in populated countries, like India for example, there are too many people entering their territory and so they become friendly to humans. If the area that you go for a walk is a little on the outskirts and remote, the dog/dogs may not have got habituated to humans intruding. Even if you are meeting him/her everyday, it is probably not registering in his/her mind. So you might have to try and win over its confidence in some way. Usually standing and trying to talk firmly works. The other theory is that there are sometimes dogs who are plain cranky and try to demonstrate their alpha behaviour.

    If it is a different dog that you encounter every day, then that could explain the fact as to why they have still not got used to you.

    Hope I have managed to confuse you a bit more.
    πŸ˜€

    Liked by 3 people

  24. Ah I love this reply! That is really nice to hear about the dogs in Uganda… yes it’s not like that in NA for sure. Some people treat their dogs as status symbols, some as family members, some as security guards… or neglected prisoners.

    One thing that used to help me get past a neighbour’s vicious dog is to enter the same kind of “zen” state that one should mentally, just before the doctor checks one’s blood pressure (pre-natal in my case, back in the day)… seemed to work like magic. He would snarl and jump and chase… and then run right past me. :)) Riverside CA! Nice and warm… at least weatherwise. ;))

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  25. I concur. It is especially annoying when they live next door. While riding my bike in a nearby neighborhood a large dog darted from its house and owner and ran toward me. Terrifying! Fortunately, it did heed its owner’s call a few feet before reaching me. Phew!

    Liked by 1 person

  26. Where I live in Norco there is an abundance of dogs and they are free in their yards (not chained or cooped up or anything like that) but they like barking to protect their territory. That’s why they don’t wag their tails. They are on alert! But that being said there is over a hundred miles of horse trails in Norco which of course runs along the houses like a sidewalk. If you think it’s disturbing to have them bark at you while walking? You should see how they spook our horses!! 😲 Some dogs lay in wait in the shadows of near a bush and then when our horses as we ride along get close enough they run up to the fence barking and some jump at the fence!! Sheesh! We have to hold on to our horses if they jump and spook!

    But most long-time trail horses (like mine) get trail savvy, and don’t flinch very much at the dogs barking away. Annoying? Yes, especially if there is a new horse along learning the trails. πŸ˜† We avoid certain streets of the dogs are too obnoxious 🀣

    Liked by 1 person

  27. Lia, you have definitely educated me about dogs. I love them, but don’t have one, although I grew with dogs back home in Uganda. The difference with my dogs is that, they are free at large within our compound. Also, we never train them, so there is no knowing how one has been trained over here.
    You are very right about social media, tread very carefully lol.
    This is in Riverside, CA.

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  28. This feels like a metaphor for some aspects of social media, to me, almost… just my interpretation though, and one I could relate to haha. Beautiful photo… !! whereabouts is this? Stunning scenery.

    Funny thing… dogs smell fear and sometimes they feel it as a threat to their own safety… so then will go into attack mode. But yes some dogs just bark at anything moving… especially when their own freedom is restricted. Very cool and thought-provoking post. :))

    Liked by 3 people

  29. Oh…please don’t feel that way. You were just being honest. Sounds like you were settling into calmness and the dogs disturbed you so that was on your mind. You were being real rather than putting on a face for social media.

    Liked by 2 people

  30. You know what, I think that’s what it is, isn’t it? They are fenced in all day long. I have thought about that before, but this changes my perception of them. Next time, I am going to take time and talk to them.

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  31. Γ€s vezes, eles estΓ£o apenas dizendo: “lΓ‘ vem a Γ‚ngela, aquela moΓ§a legal”… Os cΓ£es tem uma linguagem prΓ³pria…

    Liked by 1 person

  32. I feel the same way and was thinking something similar the other day. It is annoying when I hear the dog bark, even though he/she is familiar with us because how many times has the dog seen us? It barks anyway and continues barking until I am out of sight.

    Beautiful view of your neighborhood, by the way!

    Liked by 2 people

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